Education

College is Mostly about Human Capital, not Signaling
 http://noahpinionblog.blogspot.co.uk/2012/06/college-is-mostly-about-human-capital.html

“Skills mean nothing if you don’t have a reason to put them to work…  What motivates smart people in rich countries?… Human relationships. Friends and family. We work hard for other people. When we’re young, we work because our parents want us to work. When we leave the nest, however, we need to find other relationships to motivate us….  This is where college comes in. College is an intense incubator where smart people meet other smart people. The large number of leisure activities and the close quarters in which people live facilitate the formation of friendships and romantic relationships, while the exclusiveness of college makes sure that the people you’re meeting are pre-screened to be the type of people with whom you are most likely to click.”

The Disadvantages of an Elite Education
http://www.theamericanscholar.org/the-disadvantages-of-an-elite-education/

“When elite universities boast that they teach their students how to think, they mean that they teach them the analytic and rhetorical skills necessary for success in law or medicine or science or business. But a humanistic education is supposed to mean something more than that, as universities still dimly feel. So when students get to college, they hear a couple of speeches telling them to ask the big questions, and when they graduate, they hear a couple more speeches telling them to ask the big questions. And in between, they spend four years taking courses that train them to ask the little questions—specialized courses, taught by specialized professors, aimed at specialized students. Although the notion of breadth is implicit in the very idea of a liberal arts education, the admissions process increasingly selects for kids who have already begun to think of themselves in specialized terms—the junior journalist, the budding astronomer, the language prodigy. We are slouching, even at elite schools, toward a glorified form of vocational training.”

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